Tag Archives: 7 Deadly Sins

The 7 Deadly Sins of Writing: #7 – Lust

7 Deadly Sins of Writing-Sin7

Dang, the last sin…we were having so much fun with these!

Lust? Really, you’re relating lust to writing, David?

I don’t think it’s a stretch. Originally, I wrote the definition as, “When writing becomes an idol and you want success above everything else…”  The word lust alone can be controversial enough, not to mention the word idol. How do we define idol? The Free Dictionary defines it a number of ways: 1) an image used as an object of worship. 2) a false god 3) one that is adored, often blindly or excessively, and 4) something visible but without substance. Yup, that pretty much sums it up. Read some of those key words again: false, blindly, excessively and without substance. If your writing relates to any of these words, stop and reassess.

And to me, lust is the unfortunate state in which we replace a true love with something more superficial and self gratifying (hmmm…sounds like idol worship, huh?). It truly is the opposite of a healthy love for someone or something.

I wanna get, get, GET…not give!

So, let me ask you a question: Why did you start writing in the first place? Was it to make money? Was it for fame? I doubt it. I bet  your motivations were a bit more pure than that. Now, I’m not saying that money or fame are wrong; they just may not be the best motivations for producing your best work.

Or is it safe to say your initial motivations were for the simple joy of telling stories, creating interesting worlds from your imagination, playing with the words and enjoying their sound when read from the paper? At least one of those reasons, I bet.

Go find your first love of writing again, have fun, and you’ll probably begin to see some of your best work!

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The 7 Deadly Sins of Writing: #6 – Wrath

7 Deadly Sins of Writing-Sin6

Wrath is a bit archaic, I know. It means anger. The type of anger that gets out of control and has the potential to hurt others. As writers we want to give to others not take, right? I see this not always being outright, scream-in-your-face anger but a more subtle form of resentment even. It doesn’t take much to start blaming others for your lack of success, however you define it. Maybe your closest friends and family aren’t supportive of your desire to write and–God forbid!–want to have your book published. Don’t worry you’re not alone; we’ve all experienced it. But, ultimately, you can’t be a victim, right dear? It’s up to you to get the writing done. Shut up and write!

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Have Fun and Be Creative…or Else!

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Writing can end up being a drag for me; a major drag when I keep my eyes off the prize. And it’s been happening a lot lately. That’s one reason I haven’t posted much in the last few weeks, to be honest. What’s the prize, you may ask? It’s the fun of being creative. The pleasure of shaping a story. That’s where I get my joy, Joseph.

How did that happen? How did you lose the fun of creativity, you also may ask? Hard to say, but, as I’ve pondered the question of motivations lately (e.g., The 7 Deadly Sins of Writing), I’ve come to a realization that there are a multitude of distractions to keep us from the creative process…and from having just some plain ol’ doll garn fun (or is it goll darn?).

How about a numbered list to keep things fun? Nobody has more fun than when reading off numbered lists! Right? I believe these are the best steps to keep from being distracted from the main goal of creativity.

1. Keep it simple. And to make my point, I’ll complicate things a bit with this Fast Company article I really enjoyed about 3 Paths Toward a More Creative Life. It comes down to three simple things (a numbered list within a numbered list–yes!): 1) Disconnecting from all the technology and getting your mind back, 2) diving into the past of other great artists/creators, and 3) mastering both knowledge and skill of your particular creative path. (Read the article–it’s so much better than what I described!)

2. Get creative to get creative. What? I mean create some dumb fun to get the creative juices flowing. (What are creative juices, anyway? Ewww.) Here’s a good example: Dad Builds Incredible Spaceship Simulator For His Son. This reminds me of the joy my brother and I had building “spaceships” from my father’s scrap wood leftover while building our cottage. I was eight years old at the time, so, of course, to me they weren’t spaceships with “quotes” around them, they were very real and…fun. Now, this dad got into some serious stuff that my brother and I couldn’t have hoped to compete against, but we improvised dials and buttons with old nails and the like. Good, clean, unadulterated, American-made fun, citizens. These are fun too: Fascinating Business Cards Of The World’s Most Famous People. Amazing how creative you can be when the first order of business is fun.

3. Just do it. For as annoying Nike marketing can be, they’re right. The article 9 Illuminating Lessons on Creativity happens to mention that point first. Creativity IS hard work. But you know what? It’s so worth it in the end. When you’ve put in the hard work, it feels good, doesn’t it? Like exercise, like yard work, like eating cake. Maybe not the last one.

Anyway, just some thoughts to ponder and some articles for your reading pleasure. Remember what probably got you started in the first place: Fun and a passion to create.

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