Tag Archives: story ideas

Writer’s Block Does Not Exist

@wall

Some of you may disagree with this, but I don’t believe in the feared curse called “writer’s block.”

Don’t get me wrong: There are obstacles to our writing progress, but let’s be more specific in order to properly diagnose what ails us…and our writing.

The traditional idea of Writer’s Block being some mystical curse to blame for a writer’s lack of progress is silly. Anytime we sit down at a computer (a typewriter, a pen and paper) and nothing comes out of our fingertips then it’s likely we’ve come unprepared in one way or another. Either it’s our lack of planning and organization within the subject itself or it’s a lack of emotional preparation.  I’ve seen this with my own writing so many times. Sitting down to write unprepared can lead to disaster and delays, especially when it comes to the emotional influences of writing.

In my own writing experience, it’s typically the following that hinder writing:

  • Writer’s Lack of Self-Discipline
  • Writer’s Low Self-Esteem
  • Writer’s Doubts 
  • Writer’s Laziness
  • Writer’s Selfish Ambition 
  • Writer’s Wrong Motivations
  • Writer’s Lack of Courage
  • Writer’s Low Risk Tolerance
  • Writer’s Lack of Focus
  • Writer’s Failure to Plan

Have you experienced any or all of the following scenarios?

“What kind of crap am I writing? No one will read this!”

“Ugh. I’m so unorganized; I don’t know how to write a paragraph, let alone a novel. What do I do next?”

“I need to perfect every word, every sentence…now!”

“If I write this, will anyone read it?”

“Okay, I’m sitting down to write. Where do I start?”

“I’ll write tomorrow.”

“I want this to be a bestseller, but I’m not good enough for that kind of success.”

“I don’t want to write an outline. That’s boring.”

“I think I’ll do some research tonight [instead of writing].”

Sound familiar?

How do you overcome this giant we call Writers’ Block?

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Writing Advice from a Loser (#2) – Rewriting, Editing and Staying Organized

@pencil-bw

Plotters: “You should outline your entire story before writing!”

Pantsers (as in, By-the-Seat-of-Their Pants): “You shouldn’t waste time outlining—wing it!”

You’ve heard the terms plotters and pantsers, right? We’re all different. Like I had mentioned in one of my earlier posts, you must do what works for you. (Finding what works for you takes time–and lots of writing!) Outlining works for some; writing as you go works for others.

But here’s my question…questions: What do you do when neither method seems to work for you? Use a combination of both?

I’ve resorted to both. I think that’s okay. But is that truly the challenge? For me there’s something more menacing, more antagonistic, more…okay, it’s…staying organized. My stories get crazy, grow up, live their own lives, get jobs, have kids and buy homes. And then they don’t call home. When I do talk to them, it’s like I don’t know them anymore. Who is this story child I’ve spawned?

So the questions are: How do you stay organized? How do you keep your story reigned in? How do you remember what you wrote months ago (if you’re not self-editing along the way)?

If you’re editing early on in your draft process, that’s fine, if it doesn’t slow you down too much. Gone are my days of self-editing as I write. My current novel I spit out on page within six months because I didn’t stop to slow down and see what I wrote (and edit it). I wrote 60k words in six months. There’s something remarkable about “finishing” a rough draft. Quite the confidence booster. The boost can be short lived, however, when the quick progress you made initially comes close to a halt in the rewrite process.

Now is the hard part.

Like I’ve told folks, I’m slashing and burning my story like it’s virgin rainforest. Painful at times, but rewarding too because I get to see all that I’ve accomplished with a first draft. I’ve eliminated a LOT of my original writing flourish, and much of what I put on paper will not make it to the final draft. And that’s okay.

But with that approach do you lose connection with your story if you don’t analyze it every day? If you don’t re-read it and make adjustments as you go?

These are important questions to think about. If you haven’t been there yet, be prepared. For as much as I’m a pantser most of the time, I have to admit, the plotters are on to something when it comes to planning and organization.

Either way you chose to create your stories, keep on writing! As some say, writing is easy; it’s the re-writing that’s hard.

(But it’s still fun.)

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Writing Advice from a Loser (#1) – Know Thyself

MP900387767[1]I have published nothing. I’m on my third unfinished novel—at least. Languishing on my hard drive, there are over 50 (securely backed-up) story ideas. I’m dreadful at finishing what I start. I love ideas, but hate working out the details, hate executing every little minor but important bit of information that could haunt me later for lack of continuity. Of course, I love the end product…if I can get to an end product.

So do you really want my writing advice? I think you do.

I’ve learned a lot. I can share my pain and my suffering with you as a writer. Will you avoid my mistakes? I sure hope you do!

One BIG reason that I’ve made so many mistakes is that I’ve tried to be somebody I’m not. I’ve followed too many opinions when it comes to the creative process of novel writing and screenwriting. For both the overall writing process and the editing process.

The greatest advice I can give a writer (beside write EVERY FLIPPIN’ DAY) is this:

Here it comes…

Do what works for you.

It’s that simple. However, figuring out what works for you isn’t simple. It takes time to understand yourself. That’s the biggest reason I believe writing can be so difficult. There are no excuses, no easy detours around the hard work of writing.  It’s a trial-and-error, pain-inducing, psyche-all-in creative act—all for the purpose of discovering you and creating great stories other will read. It’s so worth it in the end.

Discover yourself in the journey, but discover yourself as you write. As you write, you’ll learn what works and what doesn’t work. Take note of those things and keep doing them.

Before you know it, you’ll finish a book.

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